We don’t know how many math professors come from excluded racial/ethnic groups. This is a problem for everyone in this country.

Fact #1: The U.S. has a STEM Labor shortage

Fact #2: The STEM Labor shortage is bad for our country

Economic projections point to a need for approximately 1 million more STEM professionals than the U.S. will produce at the current rate over the next decade if the country is to retain its historical preeminence in science and technology. Retaining more students in STEM majors is the lowest­ cost, fastest policy option to providing the STEM professionals that the nation needs for economic and societal well­being.

Fact #3: groups of People Excluded on the basis of Race/Ethicity (PEER) could play a key role in addressing the STEM labor shortage, and hence, in our national well-being

A clear takeaway from the projected demographic profile of the nation is that the educational outcomes and STEM readiness of students of color will have direct implications on America’s economic growth, national security, and global prosperity. Accordingly, there is an urgent national need to develop strategies to substantially increase the postsecondary and STEM degree attainment rates of Hispanic, African American, American Indian, Alaska Native, and underrepresented Asian American students.

Fact #4: Mathematics plays a special role within STEM

Mathematical sciences work is becoming an increasingly integral and essential component of a growing array of areas of investigation in biology, medicine, social sciences, business, advanced design, climate, finance, advanced materials, and many more. This work involves the integration of mathematics, statistics, and computation in the broadest sense and the interplay of these areas with areas of potential application. All of these activities are crucial to economic growth, national competitiveness, and national security.

FACT #5: Diversifying the U.S. postsecondary mathematics faculty would bolster the mathematics training of systemically excluded individuals.

Putting it all together

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